Meet Camille Jagdeo Founder of EDGE1 Equipment Rentals And 2019 RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Awards Momentum Award Finalist

Camille Jagdeo

Founder, EDGE1 Equipment Rentals

Momentum Award Finalist

 

Born and raised in Guyana, Camille moved to Canada in 1985 and attended the University of Toronto. Her defining moment in entrepreneurship was between 2014 to 2018, where she successfully defended her company’s name against US rental giant Hertz. Camille’s no-nonsense approach has earned her a reputation as a results-driven leader for her employees, as well as her clients. Today, her purpose and passion lie in mentoring her staff and giving back to her community.

 

My first job ever was… at Jubilee Industries. I worked in an empty warehouse at the age of 14 sorting donated clothing intended to be sold in third world countries. Providence Centre (geriatric care and rehabilitation facility). Shortly after my 16th birthday, I was hired at Providence Centre where I worked in food services.  After school and on weekends I worked in the cafeteria serving food to patients/residents.

I decided to be an entrepreneur because… despite growing up with entrepreneurial parents, being an entrepreneur was not planned. An opportunity was presented to me.  I invested in an existing equipment rental company and shortly thereafter the person that ran the company passed away. I had no choice but to roll up my sleeves and learn the daily operations of the business. Almost 20 years later I still love going to work and am still excited to learn new things every day.

My proudest accomplishment is… facing American giant Hertz Equipment Rentals in a legal battle over the name of my company that lasted over four years. My stance and fortitude in defending my company and telling my story were the most rewarding.

My boldest move to date was… selling the name of my company for a substantial gain, to my competitor and rebranding my company.

I surprise people when I tell them… that I run a successful company in a predominantly male industry, supervising predominantly male staff and that I am not administrative support staff.

My best advice to people looking to grow their business is… plan properly for slow and controlled growth, and be prepared to dedicate your time and energy to your company.

 

“Plan properly for slow and controlled growth, and be prepared to dedicate your time and energy to your company.”

 

My best advice from a mentor was… at age 16 I met Catholic priest, Father John Donlin, while working at Providence Centre. He was the single most influential person in my life. The best advice from him was to always do the right thing and you will find success and happiness.

My biggest setback was… finding out after 20 years that my life partner had been cheating on me for years. It was and is the hardest thing I have ever had to overcome. I was left standing in a storm and working harder than I ever to rebuild my life.

I overcame it by… staying focused on my companies, treating the situation as a business transaction and removing the emotional devastation completely.

If I had an extra hour in the day, I would… spend my hour on the street with homeless people. I would talk to, walk with and hug a homeless person to reinforce that I see them, and they matter.

I stay inspired by… showing those that thought I could not succeed, that although I am a female in the construction industry I am successful. Getting to where I am today and being able to mentor people and bearing witness to organic growth in my companies.

The future excites me because… I am beginning to implement my vision of creating a company that I share with my employees. I have the most amazing team and truly believe if given ownership opportunities they will flourish.

 

 

Meet Janet LePage Founder of Western Wealth Capital And 2019 RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Awards Momentum Award Finalist

Janet LePage

Founder, Western Wealth Capital

Momentum Award Finalist

 

For the past decade, Janet has been focused on creating wealth through well-selected real estate investment. Under Janet’s leadership, WWC has placed more than US$ 408 million in private equity and acquired 58 multi-family properties, comprising more than 11,600 rental units, with a purchase value of more than $1 billion. Janet’s success has afforded her national recognition and several esteemed awards. She is also the co-author of Real Estate Action 2.0.

My first job ever was… I scooped ice cream in my small-town ice cream shop, I haven’t been a big fan of ice cream ever since as I ate a lot of it! It was called the ‘Ice-Creamery’ and it was in Christina Lake where my parent’s house was.

I decided to be an entrepreneur because… I wanted to be available to raise my kids and do something I loved. I didn’t find that easy when I was working a corporate job that required me to be somewhere for 6 hours, and travel on their schedule instead of mine.

My proudest accomplishment is… I built a go-kart from scraps around a metal shop in grade 10, became an incredible welder and won (being the only girl in the class), auto mechanic of the year.

My boldest move to date was… Cutting the golden handcuffs and leaving my career with a one and two-year-old at home. I would have no medical, no benefits, everything that I thought was security, and just trying to start my own company.

I surprise people when I tell them… I grew up in a town with 10,000 people which only had one stoplight.

My best advice to people looking to grow their business is… Bet on yourself first. Everyone else is going to tell you why it can’t work, and you need to rebound from that and decide that it is going to work. Even when you fail, you are going to choose to make it a success.

 

“You are going to fall 100 times for every time you rise. Strength and growth are what you learn from the fall. Don’t hate the fall, embrace it because you are going to learn something from it that will allow you to rise.”

 

My best advice from a mentor was… you are going to fall 100 times for every time you rise. Strength and growth are what you learn from the fall. Don’t hate the fall, embrace it because you are going to learn something from it that will allow you to rise.

My biggest setback was… the first time we moved into a new city and we hadn’t done enough leg work to set up the foundation to move at the speed I expected us to move and so, I felt very disappointed. It has not been an ultimate failure, but in that moment, it felt like it was.

I overcame it by… investing time and building the foundation so as we entered other markets, we did have the right tools in place and moved at a more excelled pace.

If I had an extra hour in the day, I would… read a book.

I stay inspired by… watching the lives around me become better by what we do. That includes my co-workers, the residents in my properties and my children in watching their Mom be passionate about doing something she believes in.

The future excites me because… I don’t know what it will bring, but I know that I have the skills and a village around that no matter what we’re going to do, it will be great. When we fall, we will correct it because we have done it over and over again. I have not always had that confidence, but that really excites me.

 

 

Meet Youlita Anguelov Founder of AgroFusion And 2019 RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Awards Momentum Award Finalist

Youlita Anguelov

Founder, AgroFusion

Momentum Award Finalist

 

Youlita Anguelov moved to Montreal from Bulgaria in 1993 with her six-year-old daughter, two suitcases, and $500. After a decade of working hard to establish herself, she launched AgroFusion. Back then, she was the business and the business was her — in a small warehouse where she would pack products herself. Today, Youlita has a well-stocked 35,000 square foot warehouse, a team of 21 people and nine production lines.

My first job ever was… when I was 12 years old, I was an actress in a play that took place twice a week. My part was only 10 minutes and I made more money than the regular 2-week salary in communist Bulgaria.

I decided to be an entrepreneur because…  I worked for 8 years for one company and then 8 months for another one. I was always exceeding the expectations and still taking the initiative to do more but even with all these efforts, I found myself receiving little or no recognition. That’s when I decided to work for myself.

My proudest accomplishment is… to be living and working in this beautiful country and to have raised my daughter.

My boldest move to date was… business-wise, my boldest move was to upsize to installations that were 3 times bigger, meaning 3 times more expenses but now we’re the only ones in our field to have our own rail site. In life, it was to move to Canada alone with my 6-year-old daughter and only 500$ in my pocket.

I surprise people when I tell them… that I immigrated to Canada alone with my 6-year-old child and only 500$ in my pocket, without knowing anyone here and to an inexistent Bulgarian community in Montreal in 1993.

 

“Having a business implies serious daily problems and unexpected challenges, just don’t give up. Everything you need is around you, customers, business opportunities and money.”

 

My best advice to people looking to grow their business is… First, watch the expenses, especially the small ones that seem insignificant. Second, focus on the little things, the big things will come. Third, surround yourself with trustworthy people and delegate as much as you can. Fourth, jump in the water even if you don’t know how to swim.

My best advice from a mentor was… just build the monastery and the priest will come by himself.

My biggest setback was… to hire the husband of my best friend as general manager.

I overcame it by… letting him go and learning from my mistake that I should never mix personal with business.

If I had an extra hour in the day, I would… try to spend even more time with my daughter.

I stay inspired by… courageous people immigrating to North America with nothing and becoming leaders or successful entrepreneurs, especially women.

The future excites me because… of all the opportunities new technology can bring to help, optimize and simplify business.