The average person has about 12 jobs during the span of their working life — with this number increasing for millennial workers. Assuming that you have one boss per job, that is at least 12 bosses who will have a direct impact on your career. Some positively and some otherwise. And whilst through the course of your career you might work with a number of great bosses, there is always one who you feel forever indebted to. Maybe they gave your first job, maybe they encouraged you to believe in yourself or maybe they supported you through a difficult time. In the spirit of all things love — I penned an open letter to the Woman #BossWhoMadeMe and invited members from our community to pen theirs too.

 

 

By Ony Anukem


 

#BossWhoMadeMe: Jasmine Dotiwala 

This is a letter to my very first boss after University, Jasmine Dotiwala, who taught me everything I know today about working in the media.

 

Dear Jasmine,

As I sat down to write a letter to the Woman #BossWhoMadeMe, I realized that I have been very lucky — I have had six incredible women bosses in the span of my career, but you were my first and hand on heart I can say, that I wouldn’t be who I am and doing what I am doing today, if not for you. I came to you straight out of university, filled with zeal and passion to become a professional storyteller, but I was lacking in direction and self-confidence. You opened my eyes to certain realities in the world, helped me find my niche and taught me how to amplify my voice (literally and metaphorically).

Jasmine, from the very first day that I met you — I took an inward look at my own life and decided anything was possible. You weren’t born with a silver spoon, everything that you have accomplished, you worked for and I took comfort in hoping that I too could do the same. When I would have my weekly one-to-one sessions with you, I didn’t see Jasmine Dotiwala: the award winning broadcaster, producer, director and columnist, who has traveled around the world and met pretty much every celebrity under the sun — I saw Jasmine, who like me grew up in West London, who liked her food with a kick and who wanted more than anything to see young people winning.

I also want to thank you for the times you were tough on me, thank you for calling out my work when you knew I could do better. Thank you for teaching me that things aren’t always what they appear and that it’s important to scratch the surface — I always remember you saying ‘everyone who is a pain, is going through pain’ and it’s stuck with me and helped me to be more sympathetic to others. And lastly, thank you for teaching me the power of a Tweet, everyone used to call you the queen of Twitter — it’s ironic that before I met you I didn’t really see the purpose of Twitter and today it’s a core part of my job. You have been a connector for me on so many levels and helped me join up the dots whenever I am in need — I hope that I can keep making you proud and live up to the potential that you have always seen in me.

Love,

Ony

 

READ: #BossWhoMadeMe: Pegi Gross [Submitted by Lisa Macintosh]

READ: #BossWhoMadeMe: Bailey Wilson [Submitted by Deena Markus]

 

Would you like to a share a #BossWhoMadeMe open letter to a woman boss who has had a positive impact on your career? Send us an email with your open letter and the best ones will be shared as part of our #BossWhoMadeMe series.


Related Posts


Recommended Posts

As the Senior Vice President of Business Development at AscendantFX, Shemina ...

Learn more

    Despite the business case for diversity, or perhaps because of it, ...

Learn more

Jacqueline Thorpe is Bureau Chief for Bloomberg News in Toronto, where she wrangles a team of ...

Learn more

Christine Laperriere is a seasoned expert on helping leaders and teams reduce internal ...

Learn more

Andrea Weinberg is the founder and CEO of The ANDI Brand, a line of functional fashion that ...

Learn more